Science Education Award
CK Educator Awarded for Work to Improve Science Education
Posted on 06/25/2021
Doug Dowell with an alligator statue at a DoDEA meting

Alligators and fossilized shark teeth in the swamps of Goose Creek, S.C. birthed a Central Kitsap educator’s push to elevate science education.

As the district’s STEM coordinator & grant supervisor, Doug Dowell has helped the district adopt new science standards, curriculum and technology. He has helped CK teachers improve how they teach science. And he’s developed partnerships and learned from regional science and technology leaders.

Dowell’s work was recently recognized by the Institute for Systems Biology. The Seattle-based ISB is an internationally regarded biomedical research organization.

He was awarded the Valerie Logan Leadership in Science Education Award. Past awardees include the vice president at the Pacific Science Center and the science director for the state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Quote: Your district-level vision for high quality science education for all students has helped elevate STEM education for students of all ages.“Your district-level vision for high quality science education for all students has helped elevate STEM education for students of all ages,” wrote Dr. Leroy Hood, chief strategy officer for ISB and senior vice president and chief science officer of Providence St. Joseph Health.

Dowell has loved science since he was a kid. He remembers the Navy base at Goose Creek, where his family was stationed, as being like a wildlife refuge. He became a young naturalist.

Though he first wanted to go into medicine, life led him to a coaching gig at Fairview Middle, and he fell in love with education too. He taught at all grade levels before joining the district’s Curriculum department.

He hopes to continue to develop a system wide approach to science education. He hopes to inspire a new generation of students – regardless of their backgrounds – to go into STEM fields. He wants students to have engaging science lessons and for all students to become STEM literate so they can think critically and scientifically. 

“If science isn’t fun, we’re doing it wrong,” he said. “That curiosity is really what we want to grow.”

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